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Thread: Get your copy of the new FAA Medical Checklist

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    PRA Secretary JOHN ROUNTREE 41449's Avatar
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    Get your copy of the new FAA Medical Checklist

    The FAA has approved AOPA's medical checklist.

    You will need it and a state licensed doctor to give you a medical. Much more in the instructions.

    You can download it from http://www.PRA.org home page.
    Near the top look for these words and click any one of them.

    New Get the 'NEW' FAA MEDICAL CHECKLIST Free

    Click Here >> to download instructions and Checklist <<


    ==== More info ====
    The FAA on April 24 released the official BasicMed Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist that pilots who wish to fly under BasicMed need to fill out and have completed by the state-licensed physician performing the medical examination. The agency also published a link to AOPA's Medical Self-Assessment: A Pilot's Guide to Flying Healthy online aeromedical course that satisfies the requirement for pilots to complete a medical education course prior to operating under BasicMed. Although qualified pilots cannot fly under BasicMed until May 1, they can go ahead and make a doctor's appointment, have the checklist filled out by the physician, and complete the online medical course.

    Although qualified pilots cannot fly under BasicMed until May 1, they can go ahead and make a doctor's appointment, have the checklist filled out by the physician, and complete the online medical course. Pilots will need to retain the completed exam checklist with their logbook, along with the certificate of completion provided after the pilot successfully completes the online course. Once these requirements are met, pilots just have to wait until May 1 to exercise the privileges of BasicMed.

    AOPA recommends that pilots have the medical examination checklist completed first, and then complete the online course. The online course educates pilots about conducting medical self-assessments and determining fitness to fly, and requires users to complete a 20-question quiz to pass the course. Users can save their progress; upon completion of the course, BasicMed rules require the user to provide some basic information about the pilot and the physician who conducted the exam (such as name, address, and telephone number), the date of the exam, and a few certifications as to the pilot’s fitness to fly.

    “We fought long and hard for this on behalf of our members, and we’re excited that pilots can now start the BasicMed process,” said AOPA President Mark Baker. “You’re now cleared to take the necessary steps to get in the air as of May 1.”
    Fit to Fly resources
    AOPA has developed a suite of Fit to Fly resources to walk you and your state-licensed physician through the BasicMed process to make it as easy as possible for you to be ready to fly as pilot in command when the medical reform rules go into effect May 1.
    BasicMed checklist
    AOPA's Medical Self-Assessment: A Pilot's Guide to Flying Healthy online aeromedical course
    Pilot resources for BasicMed
    BasicMed frequently asked questions
    Conditions requiring additional attention
    Medications database
    Physician resources for treating pilots
    Quiz: Can you fly under BasicMed?

    To qualify for BasicMed, pilots must hold a valid U.S. driver’s license and comply with any restrictions; have held a valid FAA medical certificate, regular or special issuance, on or after July 15, 2006; and not had their most recent medical revoked, suspended, or withdrawn, or most recent application denied. Pilots with a medical history or diagnosis of certain cardiac, neurological, or mental health conditions, will need a one-time-only special issuance for each condition.

    Under BasicMed, pilots can fly as pilot in command of aircraft authorized to carry up to six occupants and weighing up to 6,000 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight; carry up to five passengers; fly within the United States day or night, VFR or IFR; at altitudes up to 18,000 feet msl; and up to 250 knots indicated airspeed as long as they take the free online aeromedical course every two years (24 calendar months) and visit their state-licensed physician every four years (48 months) to have the medical checklist completed. Pilots can flight instruct under BasicMed, but they cannot operate for compensation or hire.
    Click here to complete Medical Self-Assessment: A Pilot's Guide to Flying Healthy.
    Click here to complete Medical Self-Assessment: A Pilot's Guide to Flying Healthy.

    AOPA anticipates that BasicMed will affect hundreds of thousands of pilots and bring back many pilots who have stopped flying for fear of losing their medical certificate or because of the cost and stress associated with seeking a special issuance medical each year. To help those who have been away from flying for a few years, AOPA has created a Rusty Pilots program to make it easier to get back into the cockpit.

    “If you’ve been away from flying for a while, don’t worry,” Baker encouraged pilots. “AOPA's Rusty Pilots seminars will help you knock off the rust and boost your confidence so that you will be ready to act as pilot in command.”

    AOPA is partnering with flight schools to offer Rusty Pilots seminars in hundreds of locations across the United States. By attending the three-hour seminar, you will receive an instructor’s endorsement that meets the minimum requirement for the ground portion of the flight review, and you will get the opportunity to meet local flight instructors so that you can schedule a lesson to complete the ground and flight portion of a review. (Rusty Pilots seminars are free to all AOPA members!) Nearly 3,600 pilots have returned to active flying status through Rusty Pilots.

    “We have worked tirelessly with Congress and the FAA to achieve medical reform,” Baker said. “Check out our suite of online Fit to Fly resources to let us help you settle into the left seat.”

    To help members through the process, AOPA has dedicated staff standing by in our Pilot Information Center to answer your questions about BasicMed. If you have any questions, please send an email to the AOPA Pilot Information Center or call 888/462-3976, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern.
    Last edited by JOHN ROUNTREE 41449; 04-24-2017 at 01:24 PM.
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  2. #2
    PRA Secretary JOHN ROUNTREE 41449's Avatar
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    The FAA encourages general aviation pilots to learn how to meet the BasicMed requirements
    Notice Number: NOTC7130

    General aviation pilots can now prepare to fly under BasicMed without holding a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical certificate as long as they meet certain requirements. They can fly under BasicMed beginning on May 1, the effective date of the January 10 final rule. It offers pilots an alternative to the FAA’s medical qualification process for third class medical certificates, while keeping general aviation pilots safe and flying affordable.

    General aviation pilots may take advantage of the regulatory relief in the BasicMed rule or opt to continue to use their FAA medical certificate. Under BasicMed, a pilot will be required to complete a medical education course every two years, undergo a medical examination every four years, and comply with aircraft and operating restrictions. For example, pilots using BasicMed cannot operate an aircraft with more than six people onboard and the aircraft must not weigh more than 6,000 pounds.

    A pilot flying under the BasicMed rule must:

    possess a valid driver’s license;
    consent to a National Driver Register check;
    have held a medical certificate that was valid at any time after July 15, 2006;
    have not had the most recently held medical certificate revoked, suspended, or withdrawn;
    have not had the most recent application for airman medical certification completed and denied;
    have taken a BasicMed online medical education course within the past 24 calendar months;
    have completed a comprehensive medical examination with any state-licensed physician within the past 48 months;
    have been found eligible for special issuance of a medical certificate for certain specified mental health, neurological, or cardiovascular conditions, when applicable; and
    not fly for compensation or hire.



    Pilots can read and print the Comprehensive Medical Examination Checklist and learn about online BasicMed online medical courses at www.faa.gov/go/BasicMed

    Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
    Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief
    PRA- Director
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    http://www.Pra31.org

    U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
    See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

    OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

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